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#1 Old 10-04-2009, 04:53 PM
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Treatment of Psychiatric Patients/Former Patients/Survivors by ER and Walk-in Clinic Physicians, Nurses, and Staff

Greetings!

I am new to this community, and I am a Graduate Student in the Sociology of Medicine, Psychiatry, and "Madness". I am currently working on a project examining the treatment of psychiatric patients by ER and walk-in clinic doctors, nurses, and other staff. I am interested in collecting information about patients' experiences when entering one of these facilities either because of psychiatric crisis, or any other reason, as these professionals have access to any past or current "psychiatric record" when a new patient arrives and seeks medical attention of any variety at an ER or walk-in clinic.
I am a psychiatric survivor myself, and I have had some extremely negative and abusive experiences at the hands of ER/walk-in clinic physicians, but I am interested in hearing about all experiences, both positive and negative, in order to determine whether or not my experiences are representative of others', or if I've just had bad luck. Any information I collect from this community will be completely confidential and anonymous. If you are particularly interested, I would love to set up an interview with you. Posts on this forum are also a great contribution to my understanding of the circumstances outlined above. So if you are comfortable doing so, please share any information - I emphasize - positive, negative, or in-between!
I look forward to all interactions and networking with this community, and am also willing to share more information about my own experiences, but would rather do this via e-mail as to avoid personal bias in my research.

Cheers!
J. Reimer
Vancouver, BC
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#2 Old 10-04-2009, 05:52 PM
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Hello J. Reimer, and

Hello J. Reimer, and welcome. On another thread, "Benzodiazapenes" you said,

"...Physicians and psychiatrists prefer prescribing atypical anti-psychotics for anxiety because they are far more expensive than the old benzos..."

I'm not certain that I understand what you mean. I would appreciate it if you would help me by clarifying your comment.

Louise
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#3 Old 10-04-2009, 06:14 PM
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I am a Graduate Student in

I am a Graduate Student in the Sociology of Medicine, Psychiatry, and "Madness".

I haven't heard of that school. Is this the name of your thesis?
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#4 Old 10-05-2009, 08:08 PM
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Hi Louise - Pharmaceutical

Hi Louise -

Pharmaceutical companies make a fortune off of newer drugs, like the atypical antipsychotics, because they charge much, much more for them (10 times the amount was about the average I found over the years...) Doctors also receive bonuses from pharmaceutical companies for the number of prescriptions they hand out for their "latest drugs". Benzos are cheap - they've been around since the 1960s, all of their corporate patents expired long ago, and neither pharmaceutical companies nor physicians profit from prescribing them. Certain doctors will admit to this truth underlying the prescription of meds - they have to me.
Thus, my opinion is that yes, benzos can be addictive, just as any drug can be. But it has been my experience, and that of other psychiatric survivors that I know, that anti-psychotics have many more horrible withdrawal effects, and cause longer lasting permanent damage to the body. For example, they have been proven to cause type 2 diabetes. This fact has been released by pharmaceutical companies in Japan (in reference to Seroquel and Zyprexa), but not in North America. Benzos have been stigmatized, in part because of truth about the potential for abuse/addiction, but also because they are unprofitable for big pharma.
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#5 Old 10-05-2009, 08:09 PM
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That's my field of study - I

That's my field of study - I am a graduate student in a department of sociology and anthropology, but my area of expertise is the recently burgeoning field of "the sociology of medicine and psychiatry" - I add madness on there for a little extra subversion. My thesis is on medicating children.

Cheers!
J
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#6 Old 10-05-2009, 08:58 PM
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scarrednotbroken wrote: Hi

Quote:
Originally Posted by scarrednotbroken
Hi Louise -

"...Doctors also receive bonuses from pharmaceutical companies for the number of prescriptions they hand out for their "latest drugs"..."

"...nor physicians profit from prescribing them..."

"...Certain doctors will admit to this truth underlying the prescription of meds - they have to me..."
Hello student, and thank you.

I would like to remark on a couple of your comments. The first quote is absolute; that "all" physicians receive kick-backs. In order for that statement to be true, you must have scientific evidence and there is none in this world, to support it.

In the third quote, you go on to say, "Certain doctors" will admit..." and "to you" which is conspiratorial to the reader, and likely, not to be proven either.

If you want to ace this, you will need to be really careful with word usage and not rely on inuendo or drama if you want to be seen as capable of being believed.



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#7 Old 10-05-2009, 09:31 PM
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scarrednotbroken

Quote:
Originally Posted by scarrednotbroken
Doctors also receive bonuses from pharmaceutical companies for the number of prescriptions they hand out for their "latest drugs".
Precisely what do you mean by "bonuses"?

In my career, I handled the financial reporting and management of physician clients. Other than the very occasional junket for some pharma-sponsored seminar, I saw no compensation to these physicians other than occasional office supplies. Sometimes tracked prescribing would cause a pharma to provide an increase in free samples to a practice, benefiting the patients.

Do you have any evidence of these bonuses?

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#8 Old 10-05-2009, 09:58 PM
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scarrednotbroken

Quote:
Originally Posted by scarrednotbroken
....... For example, they have been proven to cause type 2 diabetes.
Newer class atypical antipsycotics do not cause diabetes. They can induce hyperglycemia, and thus exacerbate a pre-existing diabetic status. Hyperglycemic effects will wear off once the medication is withdrawn, and thus no long-term effect. For a diabetic however, the condition may linger.


Quote:
Originally Posted by scarrednotbroken
This fact has been released by pharmaceutical companies in Japan (in reference to Seroquel and Zyprexa), but not in North America.
This information certainly has been introduced in North America, actually a few years ago. Please refer to the Zyprexa marketing website.
http://www.zyprexa.com/sch/zyprexaschizophreniahome.jsp


I guess I'd have to question the depth of the research here, as your statements seem to be based more on personal opinion and experience, rather than hard data germaine to a masters level thesis. But keep plugging away. This is a very important topic for many people..
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#9 Old 10-05-2009, 10:01 PM
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You seem to make a lot of

You seem to make a lot of presumptive statements here, and hold significant amounts of bias towards a number of areas of medicine.

What exactly are your hypotheses?

How will you be testing them?

It is extremely likely that "RateMDs" is a biased population (i.e. not representative of a general medical or psychiatric population).

What does your professor think of this endeavour?

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#10 Old 10-05-2009, 10:08 PM
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chrisaldridge

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Originally Posted by chrisaldridge
"...What does your professor think of this endeavour?..."
I could be wrong but I have a sense that this is a personal mission.
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