Putting a Cork in Too Much Holiday Drinking  

Putting a Cork in Too Much Holiday Drinking  

The holidays are filled with seasonal and festive alcoholic beverages from mulled wine at the Christmas market to eggnog by the fire, and even that celebratory champagne at the stroke of the New Year.

For those who indulge too much in the festivities, there could be a pill to help cut down on alcoholic consumption, according to the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence in the UK.

For drinkers who consume the alcoholic equivalent of more than two to three large glasses of wine a day, they could be prescribed a pill that works to reduce alcohol dependency. The daily pill called Nalmefene, reduces the urge to drink and has been shown to cut alcohol consumption down by 61 per cent after six months along with regular counselling sessions.

The treatment could be available for men who drink more than three to four pints of standard-strength lager, and for women who drink more than the equivalent of half a bottle of wine a day.

More than 25 per cent of the population in the UK consume alcohol in a way that is potentially or actually harmful to their health or wellbeing, according to the NHS. While the average alcohol consumption has decreased by 9 percent in many OECD countries between 1980 and 2009, the UK has actually seen an increase of over 9% over those same three decades, according to Alcohol Concern UK.

Alcoholism is a chronic and often progressive disease that includes problems controlling your drinking, being preoccupied with alcohol, continuing to use alcohol even when it causes problems, having to drink more to get the same effect (physical dependence), or having withdrawal symptoms when you rapidly decrease or stop drinking. If you have alcoholism, you can’t consistently predict how much you’ll drink, how long you’ll drink, or what consequences will occur from your drinking.

 

 

 

Sources: Alcohol Concern, NICE
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