If You Have Hay Fever, You Also Have an Increased Risk of Developing a Psychiatric Disorder, This Study Says

If You Have Hay Fever, You Also Have an Increased Risk of Developing a Psychiatric Disorder, This Study Says

You’ve got itchy, watery eyes and a sneezing nose. And now this: a chance at losing your mind. No one needs it.

A study published in the open-access journal Frontiers in Psychiatry has found a link between having hay fever, and suffering from a psychiatric disorder.

So, is everyone who sneezes at the sight of grass in or trees in June in line to suffer mental disruption?

No. But there appears to be an increased risk, say researchers at Tri-Service General Hospital in Taiwan.

To conduct their work, researchers studied patients of all ages. They looked at people in a database of health Taiwanese insurance claims.  46,647 claims reported having allergic diseases, and 139,941 people didn’t have them.

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It was found that over a 15-year period, 10.8% of people with allergic diseases developed a psychiatric disorder. In comparison,  just 6.7% of individuals with no allergies developed them.

Admittedly, the increase is small, but it’s out there.

This was the first study ever done to find a connection between common allergies and the overall risk of developing a psychiatric disorder.

“As a clinician, I observed that some patients with the three ‘A’s appeared to suffer emotionally,” says Tzeng. “Therefore, I wanted to clarify whether these allergic diseases are associated with psychiatric disorders.”

Scientists say they don’t know why the connection exists, but they guess that it could have something to do with the inflammation allergies can cause. Further studies are needed, however.

For the moment, get the best nasal spray you can, and stay comfortable.

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