How Drinking Tea May Cut Your Fracture Risk By a Third

How Drinking Tea May Cut Your Fracture Risk By a Third

A new study has found that the habit of drinking tea could be your new best friend.

Researches from Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital in Perth, the Royal Perth Hospital and the Flinders University of South Australia in Adelaide studied the bones of almost 1,200 women in their seventies and how drinking tea affected their skeletal health over a ten-year period.

It was found that consuming the common brew might improve bone density. According to a report on express.co.uk, the studied showed  that women who drank three or more cups of tea every day were 30 per cent less likely to have suffered a bone break than those who drank less than one cup of tea a week.

PIC BY PAUL GROVER AT THE TEA AND HEALTH DEBATE AT THE INSTITUTE OF MEDICINE IN LONDON WHERE HEALTH EXPERTS ARGUED FOR PEOPLE TO DRINK MORE TEA WHICH WOULD BE MORE BENEFICIAL TO HEALTH PIC SHOWS JOANNE MOORE AND JULIET HOWARTH ENJOYING A CUPPA PIC PAUL GROVER

www.telegraph.co.uk

Healthy plant chemicals present in black tea called flavonoids may be acting as a protective force for bones, reducing the risk of fracture and breakage, as we age.

“We have shown that a higher intake of black tea and flavonoids was associated with lower risk of fracture in elderly women,” states Researcher Dr Jonathan Hodgson. “Our results support the hypothesis that tea and its flavonoids may be protective…Further research is needed before these results can be translated to dietary recommendations for osteoporosis prevention.”

While the results aren’t conclusive, Sarah Leyland, senior nurse at the National Osteoporosis Society, says she welcomed the findings. She believes it’s good to take them with a grain of salt, or, rather, a cup of tea, but that any news on helping to prevent things like osteoporosis, is good news.

“The best way to maintain strong bones is to eat a varied, well balanced, calcium-rich diet with foods from all the main good groups, including plenty of fruit and vegetables,” she says.

But having a cup or two a day couldn’t hurt.

The research was published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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