How Apple is Trying to Tackle Diabetes

How Apple is Trying to Tackle Diabetes

Apple is known for its iPhones now, but it might be famous for medical discoveries, in the future.

Almost 10% of the population of the United States is currently living with diabetes. That’s 29 million people suffering from problems with their blood sugar levels.

While it’s possible to live a rewarding life with diabetes, it does complicate things. And so, it’s a good thing that scientists are currently working hard to find new ways to treat the disease.

scientist-2141259_960_720

(photo credit: www.pixabay.com)

According to the Financial Post, Apple Inc. has hired a team of biomedical engineers to do some secret work. The project was originally an idea generated by Steve Jobs and it involves developing sensors to treat diabetes.

Related: Here’s How Job Insecurity is Linked to a Higher Chance of Developing Diabetes

Exactly how the digital sensors impact a diabetic person’s body hasn’t been explained, but researchers are working on it.

Bioelectronics

hand-1571849_960_720

(photo credit: www.pixabay.com)

It’s all part of the growing field of bioelectronics. This new branch of medicine uses high-tech solutions to treat patients, and is promising.

Researchers have already found ways to use electrical pulses to treat certain diseases like arthritis.

The exciting thing is that it could be changing the face of treatment, moving us away from pill-based medicine, towards tech-sourced solutions.

Anthony Arnold is CEO of SetPoint Medical, one of the companies that has discovered bioelectronic solutions. He  quoted on EurekAlert.org, and believes the future is bright.

flash-113310_960_720

(photo credit: www.pixabay.com)

Related: Is It Really Worth It to Have Your Microbiome Analyzed?

“Our findings suggest a new approach to fighting diseases… which use electrical pulses to treat diseases currently treated with potent and… expensive drugs,” he said.

“These results support our ongoing development of bioelectronic medicines designed to improve the lives of people suffering from chronic inflammatory diseases,” he added.

While still new, Arnold hopes that the findings will give healthcare providers alternative ways to treat patients that might be safer and cheaper than what’s currently available.

 

 

Facebook Comments